Native mice and rats: Australian natural history series

posted Sep 20, 2010, 3:56 AM by IRRC Coordination Unit   [ updated Sep 20, 2010, 4:03 AM by Isabella Mari Jhocson ‎(IRRI)‎ ]
by Bill Breed and Fred Ford
 
Australia’s native rodents are the most ecologically diverse family of living Australian mammals. There are about 70 species – all within the subfamily Murinae – representing around 25 per cent of all species of Australian mammals. They range in size and form from the very small delicate mice to the highly specialised, arid-adapted hopping mice, large tree rats and carnivorous water rats. Native Mice and Rats describes the evolution and ecology of this much-neglected group of animals. It details the diversity of their reproductive biology, their dietary adaptations and social behaviour. The book also includes information on rodent parasites and diseases, and concludes by outlining the changes in distribution of the various species since the arrival of Europeans as well as current conservation programs.
 
FEATURES
 
  • The first comprehensive treatment of native rodents for more than 20
  • Summarises the latest advances in knowledge of Australia's
  • Highlights the unique nature of this neglected part of our mammal fauna
  • Outlines recent extinctions and present day conservation challenges
  • Illustrated with colour photos of most rodent species  
AUTHOR INFORMATION
 
Bill Breed is an Associate Professor at The University of Adelaide. He has focused his research on the reproductive biology of Australian native mammals, in particular native rodents and dasyurid marsupials. Recently he has extended his studies to include rodents of Asia and Africa.is an Associate Professor at The University of Adelaide. He has focused his research on
the reproductive biology of Australian native mammals, in particular native rodents and dasyurid marsupials. Recently he has extended his studies to include rodents of Asia and Africa.
 
Fred Ford has trapped and studied native rats and mice across much of northern Australia and south-eastern New South Wales. He currently works in the Threatened Species Unit of the New South Wales Department of Environment and Conservation.has trapped and studied native rats and mice across much of northern Australia and south-eastern New South Wales. He currently works in the Threatened Species Unit of the New South Wales Department of Environment and Conservation.
 
(see attached pdf for the order form)
 
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Isabella Mari Jhocson (IRRI),
Sep 20, 2010, 4:03 AM
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